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Sahakari Spice Farm
Sahakari Spice Farm

Sahakari Spice Farm

Post Box No. 31, Curti, Ponda, Goa, India

The Basics

This farm is situated on a 130-acre (53-hectare) plot, 60 acres (24 hectares) of which grow spices, herbs, and fruits. Plants here include cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom, peppers, cloves, curry ginger, and turmeric; cashews, Goa's most famous crop, are also processed at the farm. Although spices are the star attraction at Sahakari, there’s also a rustic restaurant here where meals are served in earthenware pots or from plates made from banana leaves.

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Private Cultural Tour: Ancestral Goa, Shantadurga Temple and Spice Village Including Lunch
Private Cultural Tour: Ancestral Goa, Shantadurga Temple and Spice Village Including Lunch
star-4.5
$116.02 per adult
Traveler Favorite
Goa was an amazing tour. We really...
Goa was an amazing tour. We really enjoyed the spice village and luncheon. Also, the method used to show the Portuguese house and the lifestyle of Goa was very unique. We came away with great information and the food was terrific. This tour was the highlight of all our Indian visits.
GILBERT G, Feb 2013

Things to Know Before You Go

  • Wear sunscreen and bug spray.

  • This farm is great for families traveling with children.

  • Wheelchair users may face accessibility issues here.

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How to Get There

The farm is located in Ponda, an inland town situated about an hour’s drive southeast of Panaji or half an hour from Old Goa. It’s not easy to get here by public transit, and it's a bit far to walk to from the Ponda town center. Travelers who don't have their own means of transportation (such as a motorscooter) are best off taking a taxi or coming as part of an organized tour.

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Trip ideas

Where to See Portuguese Influence in Goa

Where to See Portuguese Influence in Goa

How to Spend 3 Days in Goa

How to Spend 3 Days in Goa


When to Get There

Sahakari Spice Farm is open to visitors every day from 9:30am to 4:30pm. As many spices can grow year round, there's no ideal time to visit, though the monsoon rains from June through September can turn an otherwise pleasant farm visit into a muddy experience. Arrive first thing in the morning to avoid the unrelenting midday heat.

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Buying Indian Spices

Visitors to India often like to pick up spices as souvenirs to bring back to their food-obsessed friends, but with myriad sold in markets across the country it can be hard to know where to start. Safe bets include classics such as turmeric (haldi) or cardamom (elaichi), though many travelers prefer to purchase premade spice mixes, such as garam masala (literally “hot spices,” used in all sorts of dishes) or spices for making masala chai, India’s most famous tea.

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