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Church of the Gesù (Chiesa del Gesù)
Church of the Gesù (Chiesa del Gesù)

Church of the Gesù (Chiesa del Gesù)

Mon–Sat: 7am–11:30am & 5pm–6:30pm; Sun: 7am–12:30pm
Piazza Casa Professa 1, Palermo

While you can explore the church independently, it might be preferable to get to grips with its long and illustrious history alongside a guide. Explore one of the first churches to be erected by the Jesuits in Sicily on walking or biking tours of Palermo's markets and monuments, which typically include stops at the Palermo Cathedral and the Royal Palace of Palermo—part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site—among other key destinations.

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  • The church is free to enter, although there is a suggested donation of EUR 2.
  • As with other churches and places of worship in Italy, your shoulders, knees, and chest should be covered before entering. Skip the low-cut shirts and shorts.
  • The Church of the Gesù is a must for literature lovers, as it was mentioned in Giuseppe di Lampedusa's classic novel The Leopard.
  • You should expect to spend less than an hour exploring this church, so feel free to build your visit into a wider Palermo itinerary.
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Getting there

The Church of the Gesù is a short walk from the Ballaro Street Market in Palermo’s Albergheria neighborhood. The nearest bus stop is on Via Marqueda, just east of the church. Take bus line Marqueda–Palazzo Comitini for the ARANC bus.

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The Church of the Gesù is typically open daily from the early morning until the late-afternoon or evening, with a short break for lunch. Visit at 8am to attend the weekday mass or anytime in the morning if you'd prefer to make a confession. The church is always closed during private wedding ceremonies.

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Like most Italian cities, Palermo is replete with churches and places of worship, most of which are free to enter and admire. After visiting the Chiesa del Gesù, stop at the imposing Palermo Cathedral (Cattedrale di Palermo) or the Church of Santa Maria dell’Ammiraglio (aka La Martorana), which is known for its gold Byzantium mosaics.

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